Boeing 737-800/900 Landing Tutorial


#21

Could I suggest a tutorial for the 757? It seems to operate differently than every other plane in IF


#22

Thanks so much for this, I had been struggling for many months with the 737 but you put an and to it!


#23

I know this is and old post. It actually makes sense. The amount of pressure built up under the wings at 10ft could be great enough to generate more lift than you’d want, causing the nose to actually pitch up too much during your flare. Thus, having to counteract that force be gently easing the yoke forward and “roll” the landing. Thanks for sharing!


#24

Tomorrow I’ll aim to make a new tutorial like this, but for a different aircraft. Any suggestions?


#25

787? I find it harder to keep stable during manual climb and descent. Thanks Matt!


#26

Thanks man, I love the 737 but always had troubles with my approach, this helped a lot.


#27

Great tutorial!!
But, you should keep your speed around 130-150 below 100feet as well.
B737s will maintain like 0-3 nose pitch until flare so you should keep the speed high:)
Especially in IF since we don’t have ground effect on the 73s yet.


#28

Just for reference:

The ‘piano keys’ designate the start of the available landing length of the runway. In the picture above they are below the 17L designator.

What you sould be aiming to touch down in are the big white squares designated the ‘Touch Down’ blocks. The markings before and after the touchdown blocks are 500ft spaced touch down zone designators.

You should NEVER land on the piano keys. The touch down blocks are set into the runway in order to allow for short landings, giving the aircraft flex in the landing whilst still remaining the correct height profile over the airfield boundary.

The touchdown zone’ allows for short and long landings and gives the pilot a visual clue to whether or not they are going to achieve a safe touchdown.

Landing outside of the touchdown zone in a commercial jet is a baulked landing and should result in a go-around.

Roll on landings are used to negate the ground cushion effect of low, swept wing commercial airliners. Tricky to do right but nice when you get 'em perfect!

Edited to add: Don’t try this technique on the Airbus!!!


#29

I dont think any 737 that operates commercially will go to 120kts or below when 1nm from the RWY! And why did you idle the throttle 1/2 of a mile from the beginning of the runway?